Watching television in three dimensions at home could become mainstream in as little as two years as prices for 3D TV sets drop and events like the soccer World Cup raise awareness of the technology. Although many believe that consumers will never want to wear 3D glasses at home, and 3D TVs have only been on sale for a matter of months, a combination of factors points to faster adoption of 3D than of previous new technologies. Unlike high-definition video or the VHS-Betamax battle before it, where deployment was held up for years while movie studios and electronics makers supporting rival formats battled for dominance, 3D presents no such prospect of a format war. Consumers need not fear splashing out on the wrong equipment, as the HDMI cables that connect set-top boxes to televisions or other screens can detect and support many different standards. Often, new technology finds itself in a chicken-and-egg conundrum in which consumers do not buy new equipment until content is available, while media companies are not motivated to produce content until consumers buy the equipment to consume it.

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