A beautiful video on how 3D printing has given a little child use of her arms shows that 3D printing can be beneficial in more ways than previously imagined. Two-year-old Emma was diagnosed with arthrogryposis, a rare disease that among other things, made her unable to raise her arms without assistance. A Delaware hospital manufactured a complete exoskeleten out of plastic, which now lets the child use her arms. When Emma outgrows the exoskeleton, 3D printing will allow a new one to be created. Emma already has her second 3D printed jacket, and she calls it “magic arms.” 3D printing business Stratasys that merged with Objet created this video. The printer was of Object’s make. Watch the brilliant video below.  

Technology is getting smarter by the day and some gadgets are on their way to becoming more and more portable. In related news, two students, Ilan Moyer and Nadya Peek, from the MIT CADLab and MIT Center for Bits and Atoms respectively have built a 3D printer that can fit into a briefcase. They claim PopFab, the 3D printer, has travelled the world “as a carry-on item of luggage” to Saudi Arabia and Germany, and within the USA to Aspen in Colorado. In a video of their portable 3D printer, wherein the students introduce the PopFab, it is described as a multi-tool for the 21st century. 

Recently, we tried our hands on the world’s only multi-material 3D printer, the Objet Connex series. Based on the different tray sizes, the Objet Connex series is classified into the Connex260, 350 and the Connex500. We had a brief hands-on with the Connex350. Apart from the top of the line Connex series, Objet has recently introduced its new line of affordable 3D printers from the Desktop and the Eden family in the Indian market. The main difference between the Connex series and these models is that the Connex series allows multiple material printing. The Desktop and Eden family are targeted towards individual designers, engineers and SMBs.

The Connex350 is one massive jumbo jet printer with equally jumbo capabilities. It uses PolyJet printing technology to conjure up 3D objects from virtually nothing, well almost. The printer utilizes model and support materials to print 3D prototype objects. Just as InkJet printers today utilize a combination of three primary colours – RGB – to create a vast spectrum of colours, the Connex350 uses its model and support materials to create over 60 materials, including up to 51 Digital Materials.