Have you tried Bing It On, yet? In an official blog post, the Bing Team narrates that their new Bing It On campaign has been set up on the premise that they, in their recent tests found that Bing was beating Google in their search relevancy tests, a finding Bing claims to have been strengthened by an independent study. The study found that people chose Bing web search results over Google, nearly 2:1 in blind comparison tests.

So, the Bing It On campaign is something that we tried out, as well to ascertain if Bing, indeed had come on the top. You can Bing It On here and see what you find better. The side-by-side search off that Bing It On essentially is, places the two search engines – Bing and Google side-by-side with a search box running lengthwise below. 

Type Travel in the search box

Type Travel in the search box

In a series of five rounds, users are told to enter their queries or search terms in the box and hit search. Say, you type 'Travel' and click on the Search button. Then you will be presented with two separate search logs open to your right and left hand side. The search results shown on both sides (Google and Bing) are devoid of all branding. Bing, in its official post, adds further that the test did not include ads or content in other parts of the page such as Bing’s Snapshot and Social Search panes and Google’s Knowledge Graph. 

The search results across both search engines

The search results across both search engines

Users have the option of either picking search results to their right or those to their left, or decide to draw the choice. At the end of five rounds, users will be presented with results as to which search engine has won.  

In the blog post further, Bing adds that in the test that they conducted, they showed participants main web search engines pane of both Bing and Google for 10 searches, which they pick. “Bing and Google search results were shown side-by-side on one page for easy comparison – with all branding removed from both search engines. The test did not include ads or content in other parts of the page such as Bing’s Snapshot and Social Search panes and Google’s Knowledge Graph. For each search, the participant was asked which search engine provided the best results – “Left side search engine”, “Right side search engine”, or “Draw.” After each participant performed 10 searches, their votes were totaled to determine the winner (Bing, Google or Draw, in the case of a tie).”

At the end of the study, Bing concluded that people chose them over Google nearly 2:1 in blind comparison tests. Numerically, of the 1000-odd participants, 57.4 percent chose Bing more often, 30.2 percent chose Google more often, 12.4 percent resulted in a draw.

I happened to pick Bing over Google. Have you tried it yet? Let us know in your comments. 

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