Christopher Henry Gayle, best known as Chris Gayle, is an exceptional batsman and we all know it. In the recently concluded Indian Premier League (IPL), Gayle's batting prowess got him admiration from all quarters, but this much loved cricketer has emerged as “Most Dangerous Cricketer” in Indian Cyberspace, according to McAfee. 

Chris Gayle

Most dangerous cricketer? (Image credit:

The result is the outcome of McAfee's study titled “India’s Most Dangerous Cricketer”, which looked through this season’s top celebrities of the cricketing world on their risk quotient in the Indian cyberspace. Gayle took the top slot with a total of 32 infected search results. He was followed by Brett Lee with a total of 31 infected search results and S Sreesanth with 30 infected search results. Other cricketers featuring in this list are: Yuvraj Singh, David Miller, Dale Steyn, Kevin Pietersen, Kieron Pollard, Mitchell Johnson, Rohit Sharma, Virat Kohli and Sachin Tendulkar. 

The way this works is that cyber criminals follow the latest trends and often use the names of popular celebrities to lure people to malicious sites that have been designed to steal passwords and personal information. Fans looking for results on search engines using strings such as “name of cricketer” combined with words like “free downloads”, “hot pictures”, “wallpapers”, and “videos” are at risk of running themselves into malicious sites.

The study for “Most Dangerous IPL Player” used the McAfee SiteAdvisor site rating, which points out the sites that are risky to search for cricketing celebrity names on the web and calculate an overall risk percentage. 

Commenting on the findings of the study, Venkatasubrahmanyam Krishnapur, Vice-President of Engineering (CMSB), McAfee India Centre, said, “Cyber criminals constantly leverage famous personalities and very cleverly time their attacks to coincide with popular events in luring people to websites with malicious software.  In the context of the ongoing cricketing leagues, cyber crooks are leveraging famous cricketers for their nefarious gains. During such events, eager cricket crazy fans are highly motivated to search for photos, videos, score and stories of their favorite cricketers online  and in that moment of weakness they are lured into clicking malicious links that puts them at considerable risk.”

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