How random was Google’s process of choosing winners for the #ifihadglass contest on Twitter and Google+ after all? Days after Google rescinded certain invites for the gig after they “slipped through”, it has been revealed that the list of final winners is dominated by celebrities and Twitter users who have a large follower base.

A Stanford CS Ph.D student called Andrej Karpathy put together publically available data about the winners of Google Glass to reveal that nearly 61 percent of the winners had more than 100 and less than 1,000 followers on Twitter. Also, a smooth seven percent of the winner base had more than a whopping 10,000 followers.

Cloud of common words in winners' Twitter bios

Cloud of common words in winners' Twitter bios

The seemingly random list included a string of celebrities and extroverted Twitter users who promised to stream and show the world what was happening around them. Actor Neil Patrick Harris and rapper Soulja Boy were a part of this list and had promised in their entries to detail out life on the sets using Google Glass.

Some of the other noticeable winners include The New York Times columnist Nick Bilton, co-creator of Gears of War Cliff Bleszinski, co-founder of MessageMe Arjun Sethi and YouTube viral sensation MysteryGuitarMan. It requires just a look to realise that the winner’s list is top heavy.

Karpathy also put together a word cloud of Twitter bios of the list of winners and unsurprisingly, “social”, “media”, “music” and “tech” were some of the most common of them. With the word cloud of the entries sent to win the #ifihadglass contest, “show”, “world”, “share” and “record” dominated.

Only last week, Google announced that it had decided to scrap some entries for the Google Glass contest “that snuck through”. In an official post on Google+, the Mountain View company stated that it received some applications that did not comply with its terms. “…it’s become clear that a few applications that don’t comply with our terms have slipped through the cracks, and we’re going to have to disqualify applications like these,” Google said.

Cloud of key words in the #ifihadglass tweets

Cloud of key words in the #ifihadglass tweets

Announcing this latest bit on Twitter, Google tweeted, “We're gonna need to disqualify a few non-compliant #ifihadglass applications that snuck through. Details here: http://goo.gl/oxDFX.” That said, Google has confirmed that for the rest, the channel is open for feedback.
 
The much-awaited results for the #ifihadglass contest came in only a couple of days before this fiasco. The contest was part of Google's attempt to seek people who would help it design the future of Glass. It saw a myriad bunch of enthusiasts telling Google what they would do with Glass. On Twitter and Google, they sent in their responses with the hashtag #ifihadglass. “There were so many creative, diverse, and (sometimes) crazy applications. We’ve certainly learned a lot through this whole process and it’s inspiring to hear how much passion there is for Glass,” Google wrote in the post announcing the results.
 
Google closed down registrations for #ifihadglass earlier this month. At the time, the search giant did not reveal anything about how many buyers would be receiving the device. It's rumoured that Glass is expected to be made available this year, but at a much lower price compared to the $1,500 (approx Rs 75,000) Google is asking for the initial units.

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