When Sony announced that the PlayStation 4's hard drive would be easily replaceable by users, the first question that went into most gamers' minds (us included) was: how awesome would an SSD be? The answer? Quite a bit. Sadly enough, it doesn't prove to be very practical. Tested ran some tests (get it?) on a PS4 with the stock 500GB HDD, a 1TB hybrid drive and a 256GB SSD. Check out the results:

The load times get trimmed down by quite a bit. The SSD, for example, was able to shave six seconds off the boot up time when compared to the stock HDD. Loading a pre-installed game with a disc inserted saved six more seconds. Running a pre-installed game downloaded from PSN saved around 20 seconds. The impracticality of the price-to-memory ratio of an SSD, however, prevented the testers from recommending it. Instead, they recommended a hybrid drive, which was able to offer the same benefits as an SSD but with more storage space. It's another matter altogether that install sizes of games are getting larger by the month.

iFixit recently tore open a PlayStation 4 to see how easy it would be to repair, and it managed to score 8 out of 10 for its reparability. They praised Sony’s console for its adhesive-free design, which makes disassembly and reassembly easy. It also has an easy-to-reach HDD, replacing which doesn't void the guarantee. On the flip side, the system's fan is buried quite a bit inside, so cleaning it requires a lot of disassembly. It also has a sharp midplane, which has the potential to cause injury during disassembly.

The PlayStation 4 was launched in India today and will be available in stores from January 6th.

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