A never-before-seen 1994 video of Steve Jobs shows the late computing legend in a ponderous mood and questioning the relevance of his work. The video released by the Silicon Valley Historical Association and sent to EverySteveJobsVideo is from Jobs’s time at NeXT. Job ponders whether he will leave a mark on the computing field.

All the work I’ve done in my life will be obsolete by the time I’m, you know, 50,” says Jobs trailing off with a wry smile. “Apple 2 is obsolete now, Apple 1s were obsolete many years ago. The Macintosh is on the verge of becoming obsolete,” he continues before talking about how work in the field of computers is not like penning a classic or painting a masterpiece, because computers don’t have that lasting quality. “This is not a field where someone paints a painting, and it will be looked at for centuries.” Then Jobs goes on to share what work in the field means to him and how the technology 'mountain' grows higher with little sediments of innovations. Here’s the short video:

While Jobs is talking about his time with computers, it wouldn’t be too much of a stretch to apply the same to his work on the original iPhone and iPod, which have largely become redundant since their launch, thanks to a combination of fast-paced hardware and software development.

The video is an extract from the 60-minute documentary “Steve Jobs: Visionary Entrepreneur”, which focuses on Jobs giving advice to entrepreneurs looking to break out into the computing field. The synopsis of the documentary says, “Steve Jobs was asked to give advice to young entrepreneurs who wanted to go out and start their own businesses.” 

The documentary is available on the Silicon Valley Historical Association's website to download for $14.99 and as a DVD and audio track.  The film also has interviews with Nolan Bushnell, Atari founder, Apple co-founders Steve Wozniak and Mike Markkula and founders of Oracle, Adobe and Sun Microsystems, who discuss Jobs's impact on their lives and businesses.

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