Making technology for the disabled, and then making this technology accessible, both in terms of money and ease of use has been one area of technology that has been mystifying researchers, but a teen seems to have an answer, already. 17-year old Luis Fernando Cruz, from Honduras was only in his last year of high school, when a chance meeting with a fellow student – a paraplegic brought him closer to their daily struggles. He also realized that although technology was available for them, the high costs ($10,000 and more) made them out of the reach of those in Honduras, confirms Reuters. 

Technology for the disabled (Image credit: Getty Images)

Technology for the disabled (Image credit: Getty Images)

Cruz's technology, born out of his research on those disabled has now structured a system, which runs on electrodes that has been built on a pair of affordable glasses. This setup “then tracks horizontal eye movement by measuring small electrical changes generated by the eye-ball. The software translates these changes into inputs that choose letters in a grid, providing people with motor disabilities a new way to communicate“. This was soon followed with a keyboard using the eyeball-tracking technology from Cruz's workshop. Interestingly, a year before all this began, i.e. when Cruz was 16, he built what would later be known as the first video console in the whole of Honduras. 

The technique in action

The technique in action

His interests then furthered towards studying the interface between humans and computers. Cruz's ambitions now circle around moving to the U.S., where after attending college he would be able to give flight to his profiency with computer technology.

Watch this video here to know the project in detail

Publish date: December 13, 2011 5:01 pm| Modified date: December 18, 2013 9:08 pm

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