Dual SIM Java mobile handsets, that could once have been categorized as ‘Chinese Mobiles’, have taken on a rather different avatar these days. Although the functionality of the devices may be similar in terms of navigation, at least the handset’s designs are getting a bit classier and a little less copied. Intex’s 4477 is a good example. Read on for a closer look.

Form Factor
Encased in a sober but elegant looking metal casing with its 2.4-inch TFT LCD and a dark metal keypad and navigation system, the 4477 is indeed a very classy device. A proprietary all-in-one port for charging, USB and the handsfree is located at the bottom. This and the fact that it has no hot swap slot for the microSD card are the only two flaws I see in the design factor. It’s a bit heavy and that also makes it feel like a slightly more balanced device and not one of some ‘cheap’ plastic.

The 4477 is a comfortable device to use. Its keypad is finger friendly and so is the five way nav-pad. The display is clear and comfortable for prolonged viewing; all in all it’s a classy looking handset.

Features and Performance

Unlike some of the other Java UI’s the 4477 retains the classy feel of the exterior with a tasteful theme. Functionality and navigation is unfortunately the same with the usual amount of cosmetic touch-ups here and there. At the core though, it’s no different than any of the others running the same OS. The only major issue I had with the handset that could also be attributed to a hardware problem was the handset refused to recognize my TATA DOCOMO SIM card. All others seemed just fine. Other than that the UI is smooth and has no lag whatsoever.

The handset’s media features are no different than you’d expect to find in Java handsets. To start off with the music player is quite simple but comes with a set of EQ presets. I was pleasantly surprised with the overall audio quality though. The tones were well balanced and the decibel level was high enough to distinguish my music from the screaming commuters. The handset’s FM radio (with scheduled recording) has really good pick-up. The voice recorder is not too bad, but for clear voice clarity don’t keep the microphone any further than a foot and a half away from you.

The handset is marketed as one designed for ‘Wide screen entertainment’ and while the display is large and clear enough, videos will have to be very specifically converted for playback. Most of my regular 3GP and MPEG4 test files that would play seamlessly on lower end Nokias, LGs etc. framed very badly during playback. The low-res files played quite decently but of course didn’t look too good. So video playback was a bit of a disappointment.

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