LG’s Cookie has enjoyed a fair ranking among the youth-oriented, affordable touchscreen handsets. One of the follow ups is this, the GD510 or Cookie Pep as it’s popularly called. With it’s low price tag, funky features and brand name it could be a serious threat for the ultra budget Dual SIM Java mobile touchscreens. To find out if it’s worth investing in this entry-level touchscreen instead if the Dual SIM options, here’s a closer look.

Form Factor
What I really like about the Pep is that it’s a small and very light weight handset that still manages to make you feel like you’re holding something of value in your hand. It fits very neatly into the palm of your hand and is slim enough not leave a bulge in your jeans irrespective of how tight they are. The Pep is equipped with a resistive touchscreen that doesn’t come with a stylus for access. Though it’s not specifically mentioned anywhere, the 3.0-inch display took some hard knocks and came out unscathed making it quite resistant to scratches.

The simplicity of the design makes it quite attractive and very unisex. A singular button below the screen makes it easy to return to the main menu or hang up on calls etc. The dedicated camera key also doubles up as a shortcut button to access running apps as well as, you guessed it, shortcuts to apps. A universal micro USB port is located on the same side as the volume/zoom keys. The power key doubles up as a screen lock and is located at the top. A hot swap slot for the bundled 2GB card is located under the rear panel.

Features and Performance

The Pep is using a version of LG’s S-Class UI with an option to switch over to the Cookie
interface which is categorizes application options vertically instead of horizontally. Multiple desktops (three) are available. Each desktop is associated with specific settings – one offers desktop widgets, another is for quick access to favorite contacts and the third is for LG’s Live Square. This not a social networking platform but a colorful way to keep track of your contacts who you’re most frequently in touch with via text or phone. You can select pre-designed avatars for these contacts to make it a more colorful interaction.

On the whole, the UI is quite smooth from the accelerometer changing the orientation of menus to accessing features and running them. The keypad was the one feature that I had an issue with. This seemed like the only instance where speed was an issue as there was a visible lag between hitting the screen and the information showing up on the screen. The QWERTY (in landscape) is a little too small to be used comfortably if you don’t have slim fingers. Multitasking is not much of an issue but you will find the handset’s speed affected if you have too many things running in the background.

The Pep excels in the multimedia segment. To start off with the music player is loud and very clear. The depth in the bass level is very impressive. EQ presets help enhance the overall audio experience but even on normal settings the music player is very capable of having you enjoy your music even in the loudest part of the city. In normal conditions ‘peaking’ the volume is never going to be necessary. The FM radio also worked out really well picking up all the stations in a few seconds and providing very decent reception thought most of my usage in various locations. The player reads MPEG4 and 3GP videos without any issues but it doesn’t have a ‘stretch to fit’ option for full screen viewing if your videos are in a 4:3 format. Convert your video appropriately and you’re good to go.

A few games of the non motion variety as well as motion the ones that use the accelerometer are present. LG’s Muvee Studio app to create slideshows for your pictures is also available. A voice recorder is also on board for leaving voice memos.

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